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 Your one-stop source for Bread Baking Information and Great Recipes!

If you have ever had questions about what kind of yeast you can substitute when you run out or how to store unused yeast, then look no further than this chart!

Type
How is it sold?
Equivalency
To use:
To Store:
Notes
Fresh

 a.k.a. cake or compressed
refrigerated  0.6-oz. cubes wrapped in foil, and 1-lb. blocks

1 cube fresh = 1 packet (2-1/4 tsp.) active dry or quick rise or 3/4 of 1 packet of instant

to proof:  crumble yeast into 1/4 cup of 95°F water  with a pinch of sugar; liquid will turn milky and foam just a bit

refrigerate for 2 weeks fresh
or freeze for 6 months
if it turns hard, cracked, and discolored discard it
this yeast gives a very strong and steady rise, it is especially good for long-rising breads

Dry

a.k.a. active
1/4-oz. foil lined packets (usually in strips of 3) and tinted 4-oz. jars

1 packet (2-1/4 tsp.) active dry = 1 cube fresh, 1 packet quick rise, or 3/4 packet instant

to proof: dissolve yeast in 1/4 cup of 105°F water, with or without a pinch of sugar; if liquid bubbles, the yeast is active

1 year refrigerated or longer frozen, usually the packages are dated

most widely available form of yeast
Instant

a.k.a. European
1/4-oz. foil lined packets, and 500g vacuum-sealed bags

3/4 of 1 packet (1-1/2 to 2 tsp.) instant = 1 packet active dry or quick rise, or 1 cube fresh

add directly to dry ingredients liquids used in the recipe should be 90° to 95°F

1 year refrigerated or longer frozen

this yeast is  stronger and more reliable, it was  first developed for commercial bakers and is now available to home cooks

Quick Rise

a.k.a. rapid rise

foil-lined 1/4-oz. packets, and in tinted 4-oz. jars

1 packet (2-1/4 tsp.) quick rise = 1 packet active dry, 1 cube fresh, or 3/4 of 1 packet instant

add directly to dry ingredients, liquids used in recipe should be 120° to 130°F
1 year refrigerated or longer frozen

bread rises twice as fast, eliminating the second rising period